Q. How do I refer to a book by title in-text in APA format? - CompareDjawebInfo

Q. How do I refer to a book by title in-text in APA format?

Wikipedia:Naming conventions (books)

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

Jump to navigation
Jump to search

“WP:NCB” redirects here. You may be looking for Wikipedia is not a crystal ball (WP:CBALL ).
Blue tickThis guideline documents an English Wikipedia naming convention .

It is a generally accepted standard that editors should attempt to follow, though it is best treated with common sense , and occasional exceptions may apply. Any substantive edit to this page should reflect consensus . When in doubt, discuss first on the talk page .

Shortcuts
  • WP:NC-BK
  • WP:NCBK
  • WP:NCB
  • WP:NCBOOKS
Article titles
All naming conventions
  • Category:Wikipedia naming conventions
Nature
  • Fauna (animals)
  • Flora (plants)
Arts · Entertainment · Media
  • Books
  • Broadcasting
  • Comics
  • Films
  • Manuscripts
  • Music
  • Operas
  • Television
  • Video games
  • Visual arts
People
  • Baseball players
  • Clergy
  • Ethnicities
  • Ancient Romans
  • Royalty and nobility
  • Sportspeople
Science · Technology · Transport
  • Astronomy
  • Chemistry
  • Medicine
  • Programming languages
  • Aircraft
  • Ships
Government · Politics · Law
  • Government and legislation
  • Legal
  • Political parties
Organizations
  • Companies
  • Latter Day Saints
  • Sports teams
Numbers · Dates
  • Numbers and dates
Places · Events
  • Places
  • Events
Lists · Categories
  • Categories
  • Lists
  • Long lists
  • Stub sorting
Language/country-specific
  • Writing systems
  • All languages
  • All countries
  • Armenian
  • Burmese
  • Chinese
  • German
  • Greek
  • Hebrew
  • Indic
  • Irish
  • Japanese
  • Korean
  • Macedonian
  • Mongolian
  • New Zealand
  • Old Norse
  • Polish
  • Russian
  • Tibetan
  • Ukrainian
  • Vietnamese
Formatting
  • Capitalization
  • Definite or indefinite article at beginning of name
  • Plurals
  • Acronyms
  • Technical restrictions
  • v
  • t
  • e

This is a naming conventions guideline for the naming of Wikipedia articles about books, which includes printed books and e-books.

The titles of books (usually meaning the title of the literary work contained in the book) are capitalized by the same convention that governs other literary and artistic works such as plays, films, paintings etc.

Contents

  • 1 Scope and definitions
    • 1.1 Manuscripts
    • 1.2 Ancient use of the term “book”
    • 1.3 Series
    • 1.4 Comics
    • 1.5 Periodicals
    • 1.6 Poems and lyrics
    • 1.7 Bibliographies
  • 2 Title translations
  • 3 When the title version “best known in English” cannot be determined
  • 4 Subtitles
  • 5 Standard disambiguation
  • 6 Article title format
  • 7 Precision
  • 8 See also

Scope and definitions[ edit ]

Manuscripts[ edit ]

Main page: Wikipedia:Naming conventions (manuscripts)

A unique manuscript can have the physical form of a book (e.g. the Eton Choirbook ): in such case the naming conventions on manuscripts take precedence over the guidance relating to books on this page. By contrast The Eton Choirbook: Facsimile with Introductory Study, published in 2010, is a book in the meaning of the present guideline.

Ancient use of the term “book”[ edit ]

From antiquity to the early modern age it was not uncommon for either the author or subsequent scribes or editors to divide a single written work into separate “books” (volumes, tomes, scrolls), where a more modern author would call such subdivisions “parts” or even “chapters”: for example Caesar ‘s Commentarii de Bello Gallico contains eight “books”, somewhat of “chapter” length when compared to more modern writings.

For the purpose of this guideline, “book” means the entire work, and not a subdivision, even if that subdivision has a (subsidiary) title of its own.

Series[ edit ]

Sometimes books are collected into a larger entity, for example a ” trilogy “, or another type of series. Whether Wikipedia treats the individual books on separate pages, or the whole collection of such serialized books on a single page, varies from case to case. In general, however, the “series” page is created first, spinning off pages on individual books only if necessary.

Examples: Oresteia The Forsyte Saga Les Rougon-Macquart In Search of Lost Time …For Dummies – Aubrey–Maturin series

For italicization see Wikipedia:Manual of Style/Titles#Series titles .

Comics[ edit ]

Main page: Wikipedia:Naming conventions (comics)

See the “comics” Naming Conventions guideline for comics and graphic novels.

Periodicals[ edit ]

This guideline does not contain specific information on how to name Wikipedia articles on periodicals (magazines, newspapers, etc.). In most cases naming such articles will not be problematic, nor incompatible with this guideline, except that for periodicals that have no specific English edition, the title is usually not translated (example: Pravda , not The Truth ).

Examples: Reader’s Digest Nature (journal) – The Lancet The Times The New York Times Acta Diurna Vogue (magazine) – Spirou (magazine)

Poems and lyrics[ edit ]

Poems normally follow this guideline on books, e.g. The Lady of the Lake (poem) , for the Walter Scott poem. However not italicized when not published as a separate book, e.g. Sonnet 130 , ” An Arundel Tomb “.

Articles on the text used for musical compositions (aka “lyrics”, “libretto”,…) are usually not separated from the articles on those musical compositions, and follow the naming conventions for such types of works, e.g.:

  • La donna del lago , opera based on The Lady of the Lake – Wikipedia page name according to Wikipedia:Naming conventions (operas)
  • Ave Maria (Schubert) , a.k.a. Ellens dritter Gesang , based on the same poem by Walter Scott – Wikipedia page name according to Wikipedia:Naming conventions (music)

…unless the text started to live a life on its own, like the L’Olimpiade libretto – which is an article about a book in the sense of this guideline.

However, texts that are as well a prayer and/or liturgical/ritual text, as they are also standard lyrics for compositions (e.g. Kaddish , Requiem , Salve Regina , Missa brevis , Wessobrunn Prayer ) have the title of their main article (that is the article not on a particular composition) not italicized.

Bibliographies[ edit ]

Further information: Wikipedia:WikiProject Bibliographies § Naming

See the style guide of the Bibliographies WikiProject for recommendations on the naming of bibliographies.

Title translations[ edit ]

Main page: Wikipedia:Naming conventions (use English)

Should a book title, of a book originally written in a foreign language, be translated into English?

If the original language does not use the Latin alphabet , the title is normally translated. Preferably in English, example: “Οἰδίπους Τύραννος” → Oedipus the King (not “Oedipus Rex“, which is the Latin translation).

However, in some cases, when a transcription or transliteration of a title originally not in Latin alphabet, is better known, and/or less ambiguous, that version of the title can be used, example: Tao Te Ching (though in this case the situation is further muddied by the choice between Wade–Giles and pinyin Chinese language romanizations ).

If the book is best known by an English title, use that version of the title.

Also books that haven’t been published in English (yet) are preferably referred to by an English version of the title, if the title in the original language would not easily be recognised by the majority of English speakers, for instance (from José Saramago#Bibliography ): Lucidity (a translation of the title for example used on this page in 2004), and not Ensaio sobre a Lucidez. Some time later the publication of the English translation of the book was announced [1] , causing the link in the author’s article to be changed to Seeing (novel) [2] .

When the title version “best known in English” cannot be determined[ edit ]

For some books it cannot be determined, not even by educated guesswork, which version of the title is the most common. For these books, try to determine which of the widely spread versions of the book in the English-speaking world was the most authoritative original (that is, the version that contributed most to the book’s becoming known in the English-speaking world), and stick to the title as it appeared on that edition.

Example: Oscar Wilde ‘s play Salomé/Salome was first written in French (title: Salomé), but the first printed edition in English, of which the translation was supervised by the author, was Salome. Notwithstanding that later English editions variously had either Salomé or Salome on the title page, the Wikipedia article is at Salome (play) .

Subtitles[ edit ]

If an authoritative edition of a book has letters of various size on its title page, everything after the largest print is (usually) considered “subtitle” in the context of this guideline

Shortcuts
  • WP:SUBTITLES
  • WP:SUBTITLE

Usually, a Wikipedia article on a book (or other medium, such as a movie, TV special or video game) does not include its subtitle in the Wikipedia page name, per WP:CONCISE . The only exception to that is short article titles, for disambiguation purposes. Examples:

  • Orlando: A Biography , not Orlando (novel) , nor Orlando (book) , both of which are redirects; Orlando redirects to Orlando, Florida . (The subtitle A Novel, however, is not sufficient by itself to disambiguate among two or more novels where one bears the subtitle and another does not.)
  • A History of Western Philosophy , not A History of Western Philosophy and Its Connection with Political and Social Circumstances from the Earliest Times to the Present Day
  • The Social Contract , not On the Social Contract; or, Principles of Political Rights
  • On the Origin of Species , not On the Origin of Species by Means of Natural Selection, or the Preservation of Favoured Races in the Struggle for Life , nor On the Origin of Species by Means of Natural Selection (see example image at right →)

Except for extremely long ones, it is best to provide redirects from the title including the subtitle. The standard separator for the title and the subtitle (that is, in cases where both taken together don’t constitute a continuing phrase) in the page name is a colon followed by a space, as in the first example above.

Standard disambiguation[ edit ]

Main page: Wikipedia:Disambiguation
Shortcut
  • WP:BOOKDAB

To disambiguate, add the type of literary work in parentheses, such as “(novel)”, “(novella)”, “(short story)”, “(short story collection)”, “(dialogue)”, “(essay)”, “(play)”, “(poem)”, “(poetry collection)”, etc. If none of these specific qualifiers applies, “(book)” can be used. Note, however, that this qualifier may be perceived as indicating a non-fiction type of writing.

If further disambiguation is needed, add the author’s surname in parentheses: “(Orwell novel)”, “(Asimov short story)”, etc. In this case it is not advised to leave out the qualifier of which type of book it is, unless completely redundant, which may happen for some non-fiction books like Histories (Herodotus) and Histories (Tacitus) . Additional examples:

  • From Night and Day (disambiguation page):
    • Night and Day (Parker novel)
    • Night and Day (Woolf novel)

Article title format[ edit ]

Further information: Wikipedia:Article Titles § Article title format , Wikipedia:Naming conventions (capitalization) , and Wikipedia:Manual of Style/Titles § Italics

Book titles, like names of other works, are proper nouns and thus ” lowercase second and subsequent words ” does not apply to them. They are usually italicized (see however also #Poems and lyrics above, and Wikipedia:Manual of Style/Titles#Scripture ).

This is an additional feature that can help in disambiguation, for instance, for distinguishing articles on a known phrase , and a book that has that phrase as title, examples:

  • Pearls before swine refers to a Bible quote; Pearls Before Swine can refer to (among other things) a comic strip and a novel .
  • Who’s Afraid of Virginia Woolf? is a play, Who’s afraid of the big bad wolf is a line from a children’s song.

Precision[ edit ]

Main page: Wikipedia:Naming conventions (precision)

Be aware that parenthetical qualifiers can introduce Point of View (POV) in a Wikipedia page name. For instance locating the article at Orlando (novel) or Orlando (biography) , would add POV, to Orlando: A Biography , where the author attempted (deliberately, as explained by herself) to create a fiction/non-fiction cross-over genre; however Wikipedia’s WP:NPOV does not apply to redirect pages, so it is appropriate to create redirects with these POV title in order to make Wikipedia easier to navigate.

When using the title as written by the author, and nothing else, possible implications of POV are the author’s and not Wikipedia’s. Trying to “purge” Wikipedia page names of an external author’s intentions, would be creation of a new POV; Wikipedia’s Neutral point of view (NPOV) policy includes not to tamper with what authors of notable works want to express with the title they give to their work (see also Wikipedia:NPOV tutorial#Article names ). If there are opposing views about the book title, these are better explained in the article text and not crammed in the Wikipedia page name.

Hence “(book)” or a similar qualifier is not used in article names, unless where needed for disambiguation from other Wikipedia pages. Examples:

  • Stupid White Men , not Stupid White Men (book)
  • Darwin’s Dangerous Idea , not Darwin’s Dangerous Idea (book)
  • The Divine Comedy , not The Divine Comedy (poem)

See also[ edit ]

  • Wikipedia:Manual of Style/Titles – info on how to represent books in article text
  • Wikipedia:Citing sources – a difference between page names of book articles and books cited as reference, is that in the latter case conventionally the subtitle is always mentioned.
  • Wikipedia:Naming conventions (definite and indefinite articles at beginning of name)#Titles of works – examples on whether or not the page name on a book article should start with a definite or indefinite article.

Retrieved from ” https://en.wikipedia.org/w/index.php?title=Wikipedia:Naming_conventions_(books)&oldid=846559019 ”
Categories :

  • Wikipedia naming conventions

Navigation menu

Personal tools

  • Not logged in
  • Talk
  • Contributions
  • Create account
  • Log in

Namespaces

  • Project page
  • Talk

Variants

    Views

    • Read
    • Edit
    • View history

    More


      Navigation

      • Main page
      • Contents
      • Featured content
      • Current events
      • Random article
      • Donate to Wikipedia
      • Wikipedia store

      Interaction

      • Help
      • About Wikipedia
      • Community portal
      • Recent changes
      • Contact page

      Tools

      • What links here
      • Related changes
      • Upload file
      • Special pages
      • Permanent link
      • Page information
      • Wikidata item

      Print/export

      • Create a book
      • Download as PDF
      • Printable version

      Languages

      • Gàidhlig
      • 中文
      Edit links

      • This page was last edited on 19 June 2018, at 14:11 (UTC).
      • Text is available under the Creative Commons Attribution-ShareAlike License ;
        additional terms may apply. By using this site, you agree to the Terms of Use and Privacy Policy . Wikipedia® is a registered trademark of the Wikimedia Foundation, Inc. , a non-profit organization.
      • Privacy policy
      • About Wikipedia
      • Disclaimers
      • Contact Wikipedia
      • Developers
      • Cookie statement
      • Mobile view
      • Wikimedia Foundation
      • Powered by MediaWiki

      Wikipedia:Naming conventions (books)

      From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

      Jump to navigation
      Jump to search

      “WP:NCB” redirects here. You may be looking for Wikipedia is not a crystal ball (WP:CBALL ).
      Blue tickThis guideline documents an English Wikipedia naming convention .

      It is a generally accepted standard that editors should attempt to follow, though it is best treated with common sense , and occasional exceptions may apply. Any substantive edit to this page should reflect consensus . When in doubt, discuss first on the talk page .

      Shortcuts
      • WP:NC-BK
      • WP:NCBK
      • WP:NCB
      • WP:NCBOOKS
      Article titles
      All naming conventions
      • Category:Wikipedia naming conventions
      Nature
      • Fauna (animals)
      • Flora (plants)
      Arts · Entertainment · Media
      • Books
      • Broadcasting
      • Comics
      • Films
      • Manuscripts
      • Music
      • Operas
      • Television
      • Video games
      • Visual arts
      People
      • Baseball players
      • Clergy
      • Ethnicities
      • Ancient Romans
      • Royalty and nobility
      • Sportspeople
      Science · Technology · Transport
      • Astronomy
      • Chemistry
      • Medicine
      • Programming languages
      • Aircraft
      • Ships
      Government · Politics · Law
      • Government and legislation
      • Legal
      • Political parties
      Organizations
      • Companies
      • Latter Day Saints
      • Sports teams
      Numbers · Dates
      • Numbers and dates
      Places · Events
      • Places
      • Events
      Lists · Categories
      • Categories
      • Lists
      • Long lists
      • Stub sorting
      Language/country-specific
      • Writing systems
      • All languages
      • All countries
      • Armenian
      • Burmese
      • Chinese
      • German
      • Greek
      • Hebrew
      • Indic
      • Irish
      • Japanese
      • Korean
      • Macedonian
      • Mongolian
      • New Zealand
      • Old Norse
      • Polish
      • Russian
      • Tibetan
      • Ukrainian
      • Vietnamese
      Formatting
      • Capitalization
      • Definite or indefinite article at beginning of name
      • Plurals
      • Acronyms
      • Technical restrictions
      • v
      • t
      • e

      This is a naming conventions guideline for the naming of Wikipedia articles about books, which includes printed books and e-books.

      The titles of books (usually meaning the title of the literary work contained in the book) are capitalized by the same convention that governs other literary and artistic works such as plays, films, paintings etc.

      Contents

      • 1 Scope and definitions
        • 1.1 Manuscripts
        • 1.2 Ancient use of the term “book”
        • 1.3 Series
        • 1.4 Comics
        • 1.5 Periodicals
        • 1.6 Poems and lyrics
        • 1.7 Bibliographies
      • 2 Title translations
      • 3 When the title version “best known in English” cannot be determined
      • 4 Subtitles
      • 5 Standard disambiguation
      • 6 Article title format
      • 7 Precision
      • 8 See also

      Scope and definitions[ edit ]

      Manuscripts[ edit ]

      Main page: Wikipedia:Naming conventions (manuscripts)

      A unique manuscript can have the physical form of a book (e.g. the Eton Choirbook ): in such case the naming conventions on manuscripts take precedence over the guidance relating to books on this page. By contrast The Eton Choirbook: Facsimile with Introductory Study, published in 2010, is a book in the meaning of the present guideline.

      Ancient use of the term “book”[ edit ]

      From antiquity to the early modern age it was not uncommon for either the author or subsequent scribes or editors to divide a single written work into separate “books” (volumes, tomes, scrolls), where a more modern author would call such subdivisions “parts” or even “chapters”: for example Caesar ‘s Commentarii de Bello Gallico contains eight “books”, somewhat of “chapter” length when compared to more modern writings.

      For the purpose of this guideline, “book” means the entire work, and not a subdivision, even if that subdivision has a (subsidiary) title of its own.

      Series[ edit ]

      Sometimes books are collected into a larger entity, for example a ” trilogy “, or another type of series. Whether Wikipedia treats the individual books on separate pages, or the whole collection of such serialized books on a single page, varies from case to case. In general, however, the “series” page is created first, spinning off pages on individual books only if necessary.

      Examples: Oresteia The Forsyte Saga Les Rougon-Macquart In Search of Lost Time …For Dummies – Aubrey–Maturin series

      For italicization see Wikipedia:Manual of Style/Titles#Series titles .

      Comics[ edit ]

      Main page: Wikipedia:Naming conventions (comics)

      See the “comics” Naming Conventions guideline for comics and graphic novels.

      Periodicals[ edit ]

      This guideline does not contain specific information on how to name Wikipedia articles on periodicals (magazines, newspapers, etc.). In most cases naming such articles will not be problematic, nor incompatible with this guideline, except that for periodicals that have no specific English edition, the title is usually not translated (example: Pravda , not The Truth ).

      Examples: Reader’s Digest Nature (journal) – The Lancet The Times The New York Times Acta Diurna Vogue (magazine) – Spirou (magazine)

      Poems and lyrics[ edit ]

      Poems normally follow this guideline on books, e.g. The Lady of the Lake (poem) , for the Walter Scott poem. However not italicized when not published as a separate book, e.g. Sonnet 130 , ” An Arundel Tomb “.

      Articles on the text used for musical compositions (aka “lyrics”, “libretto”,…) are usually not separated from the articles on those musical compositions, and follow the naming conventions for such types of works, e.g.:

      • La donna del lago , opera based on The Lady of the Lake – Wikipedia page name according to Wikipedia:Naming conventions (operas)
      • Ave Maria (Schubert) , a.k.a. Ellens dritter Gesang , based on the same poem by Walter Scott – Wikipedia page name according to Wikipedia:Naming conventions (music)

      …unless the text started to live a life on its own, like the L’Olimpiade libretto – which is an article about a book in the sense of this guideline.

      However, texts that are as well a prayer and/or liturgical/ritual text, as they are also standard lyrics for compositions (e.g. Kaddish , Requiem , Salve Regina , Missa brevis , Wessobrunn Prayer ) have the title of their main article (that is the article not on a particular composition) not italicized.

      Bibliographies[ edit ]

      Further information: Wikipedia:WikiProject Bibliographies § Naming

      See the style guide of the Bibliographies WikiProject for recommendations on the naming of bibliographies.

      Title translations[ edit ]

      Main page: Wikipedia:Naming conventions (use English)

      Should a book title, of a book originally written in a foreign language, be translated into English?

      If the original language does not use the Latin alphabet , the title is normally translated. Preferably in English, example: “Οἰδίπους Τύραννος” → Oedipus the King (not “Oedipus Rex“, which is the Latin translation).

      However, in some cases, when a transcription or transliteration of a title originally not in Latin alphabet, is better known, and/or less ambiguous, that version of the title can be used, example: Tao Te Ching (though in this case the situation is further muddied by the choice between Wade–Giles and pinyin Chinese language romanizations ).

      If the book is best known by an English title, use that version of the title.

      Also books that haven’t been published in English (yet) are preferably referred to by an English version of the title, if the title in the original language would not easily be recognised by the majority of English speakers, for instance (from José Saramago#Bibliography ): Lucidity (a translation of the title for example used on this page in 2004), and not Ensaio sobre a Lucidez. Some time later the publication of the English translation of the book was announced [1] , causing the link in the author’s article to be changed to Seeing (novel) [2] .

      When the title version “best known in English” cannot be determined[ edit ]

      For some books it cannot be determined, not even by educated guesswork, which version of the title is the most common. For these books, try to determine which of the widely spread versions of the book in the English-speaking world was the most authoritative original (that is, the version that contributed most to the book’s becoming known in the English-speaking world), and stick to the title as it appeared on that edition.

      Example: Oscar Wilde ‘s play Salomé/Salome was first written in French (title: Salomé), but the first printed edition in English, of which the translation was supervised by the author, was Salome. Notwithstanding that later English editions variously had either Salomé or Salome on the title page, the Wikipedia article is at Salome (play) .

      Subtitles[ edit ]

      If an authoritative edition of a book has letters of various size on its title page, everything after the largest print is (usually) considered “subtitle” in the context of this guideline

      Shortcuts
      • WP:SUBTITLES
      • WP:SUBTITLE

      Usually, a Wikipedia article on a book (or other medium, such as a movie, TV special or video game) does not include its subtitle in the Wikipedia page name, per WP:CONCISE . The only exception to that is short article titles, for disambiguation purposes. Examples:

      • Orlando: A Biography , not Orlando (novel) , nor Orlando (book) , both of which are redirects; Orlando redirects to Orlando, Florida . (The subtitle A Novel, however, is not sufficient by itself to disambiguate among two or more novels where one bears the subtitle and another does not.)
      • A History of Western Philosophy , not A History of Western Philosophy and Its Connection with Political and Social Circumstances from the Earliest Times to the Present Day
      • The Social Contract , not On the Social Contract; or, Principles of Political Rights
      • On the Origin of Species , not On the Origin of Species by Means of Natural Selection, or the Preservation of Favoured Races in the Struggle for Life , nor On the Origin of Species by Means of Natural Selection (see example image at right →)

      Except for extremely long ones, it is best to provide redirects from the title including the subtitle. The standard separator for the title and the subtitle (that is, in cases where both taken together don’t constitute a continuing phrase) in the page name is a colon followed by a space, as in the first example above.

      Standard disambiguation[ edit ]

      Main page: Wikipedia:Disambiguation
      Shortcut
      • WP:BOOKDAB

      To disambiguate, add the type of literary work in parentheses, such as “(novel)”, “(novella)”, “(short story)”, “(short story collection)”, “(dialogue)”, “(essay)”, “(play)”, “(poem)”, “(poetry collection)”, etc. If none of these specific qualifiers applies, “(book)” can be used. Note, however, that this qualifier may be perceived as indicating a non-fiction type of writing.

      If further disambiguation is needed, add the author’s surname in parentheses: “(Orwell novel)”, “(Asimov short story)”, etc. In this case it is not advised to leave out the qualifier of which type of book it is, unless completely redundant, which may happen for some non-fiction books like Histories (Herodotus) and Histories (Tacitus) . Additional examples:

      • From Night and Day (disambiguation page):
        • Night and Day (Parker novel)
        • Night and Day (Woolf novel)

      Article title format[ edit ]

      Further information: Wikipedia:Article Titles § Article title format , Wikipedia:Naming conventions (capitalization) , and Wikipedia:Manual of Style/Titles § Italics

      Book titles, like names of other works, are proper nouns and thus ” lowercase second and subsequent words ” does not apply to them. They are usually italicized (see however also #Poems and lyrics above, and Wikipedia:Manual of Style/Titles#Scripture ).

      This is an additional feature that can help in disambiguation, for instance, for distinguishing articles on a known phrase , and a book that has that phrase as title, examples:

      • Pearls before swine refers to a Bible quote; Pearls Before Swine can refer to (among other things) a comic strip and a novel .
      • Who’s Afraid of Virginia Woolf? is a play, Who’s afraid of the big bad wolf is a line from a children’s song.

      Precision[ edit ]

      Main page: Wikipedia:Naming conventions (precision)

      Be aware that parenthetical qualifiers can introduce Point of View (POV) in a Wikipedia page name. For instance locating the article at Orlando (novel) or Orlando (biography) , would add POV, to Orlando: A Biography , where the author attempted (deliberately, as explained by herself) to create a fiction/non-fiction cross-over genre; however Wikipedia’s WP:NPOV does not apply to redirect pages, so it is appropriate to create redirects with these POV title in order to make Wikipedia easier to navigate.

      When using the title as written by the author, and nothing else, possible implications of POV are the author’s and not Wikipedia’s. Trying to “purge” Wikipedia page names of an external author’s intentions, would be creation of a new POV; Wikipedia’s Neutral point of view (NPOV) policy includes not to tamper with what authors of notable works want to express with the title they give to their work (see also Wikipedia:NPOV tutorial#Article names ). If there are opposing views about the book title, these are better explained in the article text and not crammed in the Wikipedia page name.

      Hence “(book)” or a similar qualifier is not used in article names, unless where needed for disambiguation from other Wikipedia pages. Examples:

      • Stupid White Men , not Stupid White Men (book)
      • Darwin’s Dangerous Idea , not Darwin’s Dangerous Idea (book)
      • The Divine Comedy , not The Divine Comedy (poem)

      See also[ edit ]

      • Wikipedia:Manual of Style/Titles – info on how to represent books in article text
      • Wikipedia:Citing sources – a difference between page names of book articles and books cited as reference, is that in the latter case conventionally the subtitle is always mentioned.
      • Wikipedia:Naming conventions (definite and indefinite articles at beginning of name)#Titles of works – examples on whether or not the page name on a book article should start with a definite or indefinite article.

      Retrieved from ” https://en.wikipedia.org/w/index.php?title=Wikipedia:Naming_conventions_(books)&oldid=846559019 ”
      Categories :

      • Wikipedia naming conventions

      Navigation menu

      Personal tools

      • Not logged in
      • Talk
      • Contributions
      • Create account
      • Log in

      Namespaces

      • Project page
      • Talk

      Variants

        Views

        • Read
        • Edit
        • View history

        More


          Navigation

          • Main page
          • Contents
          • Featured content
          • Current events
          • Random article
          • Donate to Wikipedia
          • Wikipedia store

          Interaction

          • Help
          • About Wikipedia
          • Community portal
          • Recent changes
          • Contact page

          Tools

          • What links here
          • Related changes
          • Upload file
          • Special pages
          • Permanent link
          • Page information
          • Wikidata item

          Print/export

          • Create a book
          • Download as PDF
          • Printable version

          Languages

          • Gàidhlig
          • 中文
          Edit links

          • This page was last edited on 19 June 2018, at 14:11 (UTC).
          • Text is available under the Creative Commons Attribution-ShareAlike License ;
            additional terms may apply. By using this site, you agree to the Terms of Use and Privacy Policy . Wikipedia® is a registered trademark of the Wikimedia Foundation, Inc. , a non-profit organization.
          • Privacy policy
          • About Wikipedia
          • Disclaimers
          • Contact Wikipedia
          • Developers
          • Cookie statement
          • Mobile view
          • Wikimedia Foundation
          • Powered by MediaWiki

          MENU
          CLOSE
          • SMART SHOPPING
          • QUIZZES
          • LISTS
          • VIDEOS
          • AMAZING FACTS
          •  SHOP

          COLLECTIONS

          • Dollars & Sense
          • Power to the Paper

          SECTIONS

          • BIG QUESTIONS
          • KENNECTIONS
          • LIVE SMARTER
          • QUIZZES
          • SMART SHOPPING
          • AMAZING FACTS
          • WORLD WAR 1
          • STONES, BONES & WRECKS
          • JOB SECRETS
          • #TBT
          • THE PRESIDENTS
          • WORDS
          • RETROBITUARIES

          TOPICS

          • Holidays
          • Science
          • Entertainment
          • History
          • Language
          • Food
          • Archeology
          • Animals
          • Architecture
          • Travel

          TOPICS

          • Holidays
          • Science
          • Entertainment
          • History
          • Language
          • Food
          • Archeology
          • Animals
          • Architecture
          • Travel

          DAILY FLOSS

          • Morning Links
          • Daily Quiz
          • Amazon Deals
          • Food

          COLLECTIONS

          • Dollars & Sense
          • Power to the Paper

          DAILY FLOSS

          • Morning Links
          • Daily Quiz
          • Amazon Deals
          • Food

          ABOUT

          • AUTHORS
          • TERMS
          • SHOP
          • CONTACT
          • RSS
          • PRIVACY
          • COOKIE POLICY
          • CUSTOMER SERVICE

          MENTAL FLOSS
          ABOUT
          RSS
          CONTACT US
          SHOP
          FLOOR8
          12UP
          90MIN




          Subscribe to our Newsletter!

          SIGN UP NOW

          FLOOR8
          12UP
          90MIN

          ×
          CLOSE

          17 Overly Optimistic Book Titles

          BY Arika Okrent
          March 1, 2013

          Amazon.com

          Amazon.com

          There have always been how-to and inspirational guides, but it wasn’t until about 100 years ago that they began to use the “you can do it” trope right in their titles. The first one I could find, from 1913, was titled simply, You Can (subtitle: “A collection of brief talks on the most important topic in the world—your success”). Since then, more and more books every year have told us what we “can” do. Most of the claims are reasonable, even if they do make it all seem a bit too easy. But these particular titles badly overestimate our abilities.

          1. You Can Make A Stradivarius Violin. Joseph V. Reid, 1967.

          Amazon

          Well, get to it then. This will save you a lot of money!

          2. You Can Master Life. James Gordon Gilkey, 1938.

          Ebay

          Honestly, some people don’t know how to show their life who’s boss.

          3.You Can Change the World!: The Christopher approach. James Keller, 1948.

          Amazon

          I guess this didn’t work the last time I tried it because I was using the Robert approach.

          4. You Can be Happy with Dental Plates. Max M. Schwartz, 1945.

          Biblio.com

          Nope. I don’t believe this for a second.

          5. You Can Train Your Cat. Jo and Paul Loeb, 1977.

          Biblio.com

          Don’t believe this one either. Just look how that cat is staring you down.

          6. You Can Find Uranium. Joseph Weiss, 1948.

          Ebay

          And you’d better do it before the other guy finds it first.

          7. You Can Stop Worrying. Samuel W. Gutwirth, 1957.

          Ebay

          Yeah, right. Not with all those idiots out there hunting uranium I can’t.

          8. You Can Survive the Bomb. Col. Mel Mawrence, 1961.

          ToddAlcott.com

          Oh, then I guess I won’t worry after all.

          9. You Can Be Physically Perfect, Powerfully Strong. Vic Boff, 1975.

          Amazon

          I will throw that bomb right back in their faces.

          10. You Can Speak For God. George W. Schroeder, 1958.

          Open Library

          It’s about time someone started doing this! Our problems are solved.

          11. You Can Find A Fortune. Jeanne Horn, 1966.

          History Bound

          Great. I was getting tired of trying to make one myself.

          12. You Can Teach Your Dog to Eliminate on Command. M.L. Smith, 1985.

          Amazon

          This makes for an awesome party trick.

          13. You Can Do Anything with Crepes. Virginia Pasley and Jane Green, 1970.

          Ebay

          It’s true. I used crepes to teach my dog to eliminate on command.

          14. You Can Know the Future. Wilbur Moorehead Smith, 1971.

          Amazon

          But that doesn’t mean you should. Oh…nothing. Never mind.

          15. You Can Have It All. Arnold M. Patent, 1991.

          Open Library

          But you’ll have to give it back when the 90s are over. I know. I’ve seen the future.

          16. You Can Do Anything! James Mangan, 1934.

          Lenny’s Rare Books

          Eh, all I really want to do is play golf.

          17. You Can Play Golf Forever. Louis Hexter, 1979.

          Library Thing

          Yay!

          books

          Lists


          FACEBOOK
          0

          TWITTER

          EMAIL

          Subscribe to our Newsletter!

          SIGN UP NOW

          MENTAL FLOSS
          ABOUT
          RSS
          CONTACT US
          SHOP
          FLOOR8
          12UP
          90MIN




          Subscribe to our Newsletter!

          SIGN UP NOW

          FLOOR8
          12UP
          90MIN